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Cooking Techniques

  • Cuts
  • Cooking
  • Timing
  • Serving

Roasting

How-to prepare and cook different cuts of Irish Beef

  • Best cuts for roasting are rib of beef, rolled rib, sirloin, topside and fillet of beef.
  • For the best flavour and extra tenderness, make sure the beef is aged a minimum of three weeks.
  • Remove the meat from the fridge an hour before cooking.
  • A layer of fat mixed with mustard and freshly ground pepper spread over the roast keeps the meat succulently juicy and protects it from the heat.
  • Use a meat thermometer when roasting a joint – push the thermometer into a thick part of the joint without touching the bone:
  • For a rare roast, remove from the oven when the thermometer reaches 150˚F (65˚C).
  • For a medium roast, remove from the oven when the thermometer reaches 160˚F (70˚C).
  • When calculating the cooking time, allow time for the meat to be rested after roasting for at least half an hour. Try to slice it thinly so that you can enjoy the tenderness.

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Grilling

  • Best cuts for grilling or pan frying are sirloin, striploin and fillet.
  • For tenderness, use meat that has been well-aged (3 weeks).
  • Season well before cooking – a drizzle of olive oil, black pepper and balsamic vinegar will add extra flavour.
  • N.B. However, only add salt after the meat is cooked – adding it during the cooking process draws out all the juices, making the meat tough.
  • Heat the grill/pan to a maximum before adding the meat.
  • A cast iron ridged pan gives excellent results.

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Pot Roasting and Braising

  • Best beef cuts for a pot roast or braising are top rib/housekeepers cut, silverside, eye of the round and brisket.
  • A pot roast or braising is a slow cooking method, using moist heat – perfect for bring out the succulent flavour of less expensive cuts.
  • Before braising or pot roasting, remember to seal the beef by browning it on all sides in smoking hot oil.
  • Braising is best for serving-size portions, whereas a pot roast suits an entire joint.

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Casseroling

  • Best beef cuts for a casserole are the neck, chuck, shoulder and shin.
  • Whether on the stovetop, or in the oven, casseroles are perfect for the least tender cuts of beef, as the meat is slowly and gently cooked in liquid.
  • Before adding any other ingredients, brown the beef in smoking hot oil to seal in the juices.

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Stir-Frying

  • Best cuts of beef for stir frying are sirloin, striploin, fillet and topside.
  • Marinate the beef before cooking.
  • Stir-fry the vegetables first and remove, then stir-fry the beef in batches – return the vegetables to the wok and mix well.
  • Heat the wok or pan until it’s very hot before adding the oil – this prevents the meat and other ingredients from sticking to the surface of the wok/pan.

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