This website uses cookies. Click here to close.

WAYS TO COOK DIFFERENT BEEF CUTS

 

We can proudly claim that our beef cuts are succulent, nutritious and packed with flavours just waiting to be discovered through innovative new cooking methods and traditional recipes alike. So whats our secret? Unlike many countries in Europe, in Ireland our cattle spend most of the year grazing on lush, grassy pastures.

But there’s plenty to be said for knowing your way around a steer, as different beef cuts can have wildly differing tastes and textures. So to make the most of your beef, it pays to consider where the cut has come from and what cooking methods will bring out the best qualities.

graphic_cow

BALL OF THE ROUND

This is the most tender part of the round and is a versatile, tasty and lean cut that requires a slow cooking method to bring about its full range of flavours. Often used for pot roasting, this cut can also be sliced into steaks and sizzled on the grill.

Recipes

BRISKET

A cut straight from the breast, low in marbling and ideal for pot roasting. Prolonged, slow roasting results in a rich, indulgent meat that just falls from the bone, releasing its flavours in full. A perfect cut for creating warming winter dishes.

Recipes

DICED SHIN

Sourced from the leg, shin may be the least tender of beef cuts, but when left alone to cook slowly in a fragrant liquor, the most intense flavours and wonderfully sticky textures are created - making it perfect for a winter stew or hearty soup.

Recipes

EYE OF THE ROUND

The eye of the round is a boneless, very lean piece of meat from the bottom part of the round. It tenderises when cooked under a moist, slow heat, thus making it ideal for pot roasting and braised dishes.

Recipes

FILLET

A mouth-wateringly tender piece of meat. A fillet is an elegant cut that becomes ever more complex, deep and flavoursome when left to age. It's a popular prime cut for searing on a hot grill, but can be left whole to create a very special roast.

Recipes

FLANK

A versatile, extra-lean cut with minimal marbling. Often used for ground mince, it can be stuffed, rolled or cooked slowly as a pot roast. It can also take on an entire range of new flavours when marinated and grilled.

Recipes

NECK/ CHUCK/ SHOULDER

These are lean, extra-tasty cuts which require good trimming and slow cooking to release their rich, intense flavours and soft, flaky texture. They are some of the best cuts for mincing, casseroling or braising.

Recipes

ONGLET

Onglet, or hanger steak, has a loose grain and can be very tender, but only if served rare. If you prefer your steak well done, it would best to braise the cut for a long time.

Recipes

RIB OF BEEF

This is heavily marbled cut great for slow roasting and with the bone in, you can expect a sweeter more intense flavour. A year-round favourite ; rib of beef can serve as the perfect centrepiece for cold winter evenings, or as a summer BBQ staple.

Recipes

ROLLED RIB

A versatile shoulder cut with heavy marbling and extra fat content; creating a multitude of rich tastes, flavours and sensations. It's the perfect cut for slow roasting, which will serve to deepen and intensify the flavours even further.

Recipes

SHIN

Recipes

SILVERSIDE

Silverside is another lean cut from the hind. Not only is silverside economical, but when cooked correctly and with care, it can be the epitome of full bodied, rich flavour. Ideal for pot roasting, but can also be minced to create fantastic burgers.

Recipes

SIRLOIN

A traditional loin cut that deservedly enjoys a loyal following. Less moist than a rib-eye due to a lower fat content but more flavourful than a fillet cut, sirloin is a prime steak cut full of taste, grill it to release its maximum potential.

Recipes

STRIPLOIN

A particularly tender cut that releases a spectrum of flavours depending on cooking methodology. It's best roasted with a small amount of fat covering it for extra flavour, but if it's well-aged, cut it into steaks and sizzle them on the grill.

Recipes

TOP RIB/ HOUSEKEEPERS CUT

An economical cut with heavy marbling and extra fat content - which makes it the perfect choice for slow roasting. When roasted with a little liquid and the bone left in, the meat will release sweet succulent flavours, in turn becoming soft and tender.

Recipes

TOPSIDE

A traditional roasting joint with minimal marbling and sourced from the hind. Slow-roasting is the preferred method of cooking; ensuring the meat is kept moist throughout will help keep the meat soft and encourage the release of a subtle, tender spectrum of flavours.

Recipes